Tag: Julie Garwood

Retro Review: Shadow Music by Julie Garwood

Posted February 22, 2017 by Holly in Discussions, Reviews | 15 Comments

Retro Review: Shadow Music by Julie GarwoodReviewer: Holly
Shadow Music by Julie Garwood
Series: Highlands Lairds #3
Also in this series: Ransom
Published by Ballantine Books
Publication Date: 2008
Genres: Fiction, Romance, Historical, General
Pages: 438
Buy on Amazon | Barnes & Noble
Goodreads
two-half-stars

Throughout her acclaimed writing career, Julie Garwood has captivated readers with characters who are compelling, daring, and bursting with life. Now one of the most popular novelists of our time proudly returns to her beloved historical romance roots–in a thrilling tale of love, murder, adventure, and mystery set against the haunting landscape of medieval Scotland.
For Princess Gabrielle of St. Biel, Scotland is a land of stunning vistas, wild chieftains, treacherous glens, and steep shadows–skullduggery, betrayal, and now murder. Prized for her exquisite beauty, the daughter of one of England’s most influential barons, Gabrielle is also a perfect bargaining chip for a king who needs peace in the Highlands: King John has arranged Gabrielle’s marriage to a good and gentle laird. But this marriage will never take place.
For Gabrielle, everything changes in one last burst of freedom–when she and her guards come upon a scene of unimaginable cruelty. With one shot from her bow and arrow, Gabrielle takes a life, saves a life, and begins a war.
Within days, the Highlands are aflame with passions as a battle royal flares between enemies old and new. Having come to Scotland to be married, Gabrielle is instead entangled in Highland intrigue. For two sadistic noblemen, underestimating Gabrielle’s bravery and prowess may prove fatal. But thanks to a secret Gabrielle possesses, Colm MacHugh, the most feared man in Scotland, finds a new cause for courage. Under his penetrating gaze, neither Gabrielle’s body nor heart is safe.
A gripping novel that delves into the heart of emotions–unyielding passions of love, hate, revenge, and raw desire–Shadow Music is magnificent gift from Julie Garwood and a crowning achievement in her amazing career.
From the Hardcover edition.

******As part of our 10 year anniversary celebration, we’ll be re-posting old reviews that make us cringe, laugh or sigh all over again.

Man, I love me some early Julie Garwood historicals. She lost me with her romantic suspense. I remember being so excited when she announced she was releasing a new historical. I’m still pretty disappointed it didn’t live up to my expectations. I wonder what would happen if I read it now? I might need to reread it and see if I still feel the same. 

This review was originally published January 8, 2008

This is less a review about this particular book and more my thoughts on the writing of Julie Garwood. Casee reviewed the book here. You can check that out for a plot summary and her thoughts, for they mostly mirrored mine.

Throughout her career, JG has remained a favorite of mine. Well, let me clarify. Prior to Killjoy she was a favorite of mine. Her historicals still call to me on occasion and I find myself picking them up at random, anxious to sink into an old, comfortable story, similar to how I might slip on my favorite sweats after a long day at work, or pop in a favorite DVD if I’ve had a particularly bad day.

But after Killjoy, not only did I think contemps were not her thing, I decided her writing itself deteriorated. The last novel I read by her was Slow Burn. While I enjoyed the basic premise behind it, I was sadly disappointed in the actual writing. Sentences were choppy, paragraphs seemed to bleed together, or go in odd directions that made no sense to me, dialogue was stilted, characters were half formed or one dimensional. I thought the plot was an awesome one, and had it been better fleshed out it had the potential to become her best written novel yet. But instead it fell far short.

After that, I decided not to read another of her contemps. I told myself, and others, that I’d buy her again if she went back to historicals, but otherwise I was done with her. I removed her from my auto-buy list and comforted myself with her old historicals, the ones that got me hooked on romance to begin with.

Then the announcement came. That yes, Julie Garwood, historical legend, would be returning to her roots. Love her older historicals or hate them, you can’t deny she’s a basic staple in romance. I was happy to hear she’d be returning, but somewhat apprehensive. Because although the moment I’d been waiting for had finally come, I was concerned about her actual writing style. The way she wove a story back when was unconventional perhaps, but still engaging. I didn’t think she’d be able to return to that, not after seeing evidence of her decline in her more recent novels.

I’m sad to say I was correct. She may have done quite a bit of head-hopping in her previous novels, but the focus remained on the two main protagonists. In this novel, however, she chose to write in a more narrative style than from one POV or another. So I was constantly pulled out of the story by her glossing over things, or seeming to sum things up. Very frustrating.

I’m also extremely unclear about how they H/H came to fall in love. There was hardly any interaction between the two, and what there was was disjointed and…once again, glossed over. There seemed to be no rhyme or reason to her writing. A chapter would start out from one POV or another, and then half-way through she’d jump into a narrative style, summing things up rather than allowing us as readers to follow the progress.

I suppose it would be like me starting a story, in which I use rich, colorful detail and much humor only to say, once you’re engaged and intrigued, “Blah blah, yada, yada, you get what I mean” and then just leave it at that. Frustrating, no?

There were some good parts. When the POV was written from either the hero or heroine, I was drawn into the story. Unfortunately, those parts were few and far between, and when they did happen, they didn’t last long. The basic premise was also a good one, and classic Garwood. Sadly, the point of the plot was lost somewhere in the muddle of switching from one writing style to another, the jumping between characters and places (i.e., from the Barons in England to the clans in the Highlands to the heroine to the hero to the guards of the heroine to her father back to the barons to the king of England, etc, etc) and the mass amount of inconsistencies presented.

A lot of the reviews I’ve read for this book said the Priests provided a lot of comic relief, but I didn’t really see that. Sure, there were some amusing parts, but I think I assumed they played a bigger part in the overall story (with actual read time, I mean) and that just didn’t seem to be the case.

I’m sure I’ll end up buying her next book (assuming she continues to write historicals), just to see if she somehow improves…hmm, or perhaps that’s not the right word. Regresses into her old writing habits? Goes back to being the Garwood I knew and loved? I’m not sure. I have a feeling I’m going to be sorely disappointed when (if) that time comes, however.

On a related note: Ange, The Romance Groupie, posted about this book on Saturday. I mentioned my disappointment in the overall writing in the comments, and she responded with this:

Actually, I’ve noticed that many of the popular authors appear to be going down in the quality department. I’m wondering if it’s the editors, publishers, etc. that are ruining it. It just seems strange that so many great authors have gone bad in the last year or so. Is it just me? Are you seeing this trend too?

I thought about it some, and yes, I have to agree. Some of my favorite authors have seriously declined in the last few years. Could it be because of the publishers or editors? Or is it just simply something with them personally?

Regardless, I’m disappointed.

Even though I said this was less a review and more my thoughts on JG’s writing as a whole, I’ll still rate the book:

2.5 out of 5

You can buy it here in hardback or in eBook format here. When I bought it from Books on Board, they were offering a $5 cash-back incentive, bringing the total book price down to $9.95. I’m not sure if they’re still offering the promotion, but you could email them to see.

two-half-stars

15 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


Sunday Spotlight: The Secret by Julie Garwood

Posted February 19, 2017 by Casee in Features | 7 Comments

Sunday Spotlight is a feature we began in 2016. This year we’re spotlighting our favorite books, old and new. We’ll be  raving about the books we love and being total fangirls. You’ve been warned. 🙂

Sunday Spotlight

I love Julie Garwood. Her books introduced me to a whole new world of romance. I didn’t know what a historical romance was until I read one of her books. I didn’t appreciate humor in historicals until I read one of her books. She remains one of my favorite authors to this day. This book holds a special place in my heart.

The Secret by Julie Garwood
Genres: Historical, Romance
Release Date: May 1, 1992
Publisher: Pocket Books

Judith Hampton was as beautiful as she was proud and loyal. Her dear Scottish friend from childhood was about to give birth, and Judith had promised to be at her side. But there was another, private reason for the journey from her bleak English home to the Highlands: to meet the father she had never known, the Laird Maclean. Nothing prepared her, however, for the sight of the Scottish barbarian who was to escort her into his land…Iain Maitland, Laird of his clan, a man more powerfully compelling than any she had ever encountered.

In a spirited clash of wills and customs, Judith reveled in the melting bliss of Iain’s searching kisses, his passionate caresses. Perplexed by her sprightly defiance, bemused by her tender nature, Iain felt his soul growing into the light and warmth of her love. Surely nothing would wrench her from the affection and trust of Iain and his clan…not even the truth about her father, a devastating secret that could shatter the boldest alliance, and the most glorious of loves!

Order the Book:

AMAZON || BARNES AND NOBLE || KOBO

This book is about the romance between Judith and Iain, yes. But it’s also about a friendship between two women that nothing could break. Not time, not distance, not politics, not war. It’s about family.

Excerpt

“It will be a hard ride up the mountains, lass, and it would serve you better if you rode with one of us.”

She shook her head. The idea of being so close to the handsome man wasn’t actually displeasing, but she didn’t want him to think of her as inferior. She’d had enough of that in the past to las her a lifetime.

“I’m very fit for this journey,” she boasted. “You needn’t worry about me keeping up.”

Iain held his exasperation. “There will also be times when we’ll have to ride through hostile territory,” he patiently explained. “Our counts are trained to be quiet–”

“My horse will be just as quiet,” she interjected.

He suddenly smiled at her. “Will she be as quiet as you are?”

She immediately nodded.

He let out a sigh. “I suspected as much.”

And this…

“Go inside now, Judith, while I still have enough discipline to let you.”

“If you dislike kissing me so much, why do you continue to do so?”

She look throughly disgruntled. He laughed.

She took exception to that reaction. “You may let go of me now,” she ordered.

“I already have.”

And how can you not love this bit of arrogance?

“Don’t you dare weep,” he commanded.

“You’ve broken my heart.”

“I’ll fix it later.”


I adore this book and you will too. Why haven’t you read it?

Giveaway: We’re giving one lucky winner their choice of one of our Sunday Spotlight books. Use the Rafflecopter widget below to enter for one of this month’s features.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

About the Author

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK | PINTEREST

It’s no surprise that Julie Garwood became a writer. Growing up in a large family of Irish heritage, she took to storytelling naturally. “The Irish relish getting all the details of every situation,” she explains. “Add in the fact that I was the sixth of seven children. Early in life I learned that self-expression had to be forceful, imaginative, and quick.”

Creating stories was always a passion for Julie, but she didn’t focus on making it a career until the youngest of her three children entered school. After the publications of two young adult books, she turned her interests to historical fiction. Her first novel, GENTLE WARRIOR, was published in 1985, and there has been a steady parade of bestsellers ever since. Today more than 40-million copies of her books are in print, and they are translated in dozens of languages around the world. One of her most popular novels, FOR THE ROSES, was adapted for a HALLMARK HALL OF FAME production on CBS.

Whether the setting be medieval Scotland, Regency England, frontier Montana, or modern-day Louisiana, her themes are consistent: family, loyalty, and honor. Readers claim that it’s the humor as well as poignancy of her novels that keep them coming back for more. Julie described her goals this way: “I want my readers to laugh and cry and fall in love. Basically, I want them to escape into another world for a little while and afterwards to feel as though they’ve been on a great adventure.”

Julie lives in Leawood, Kansas, and is currently working on her next novel.

7 Comments
Tags: ,


Sunday Spotlight: Honor’s Splendour by Julie Garwood

Posted January 8, 2017 by Rowena in Features | 7 Comments

Sunday Spotlight is a feature we started in 2016 and we’re going to keep the party going in 2017. This year, we’ll be spotlighting our favorite books each week. Old or new, if it’s on our favorites list than it will be featured on the blog. Beware, there will be loads of fangirling going on. 🙂

Sunday Spotlight

Back when I first started reading romance novels, Julie Garwood was my favorite author. I glommed her books over and over again, discussed every book to death each month and fought with Holly over every one of her heroes. Duncan Wexton was my jam. I loved him so much. I loved his story even more and that is the reason I’m spotlighting Honor’s Splendour today.

Honor’s Splendour by Julie Garwood
Genres: Historical, Romance
Release Date: April 30, 1991
Publisher: Pocket Books

This classic medieval romance from New York Times bestselling author Julie Garwood is a fan favorite—a beautiful lady needs rescue from a knight in shining armor, and gets an alpha warrior instead.

In the feuding English court, gentle Lady Madelyne suffered the cruel whims of her ruthless brother, Baron Louddon. Then, in vengeance for a bitter crime, Baron Duncan of Wexton—the Wolf—unleashed his warriors against Louddon. Exquisite Madelyne was the prize he catured…but when he gazed upon the proud beauty, he pledged to protect her with his life. In his rough-hewn castle, Duncan proved true to his honor. But when at last their noble passion conquered them both, she surrendered with all her soul. Now, for love, Madelyne would stand fast…as bravely as her Lord, the powerful Wolf who fought for…Honor’s Splendour.

Order the Book:

AMAZON || BARNES AND NOBLE || KOBO

This book cemented its spot on my favorites list the moment Madeleine warmed Duncan’s feet. Their romance wrapped me up in feels and I loved every minute of it. Every character. Every scene. Everything. Julie Garwood writes fantastic romances and this is one of her bests. This is one of the books that I re-read the most, it’s that good.

Here are some quotes from the book that will hopefully showcase why I love this book so much and think everyone should read and love it too. 🙂

“He’d gone to Louddon’s fortress to take Madelyne captive. His plan was revenge; an eye for an eye. And that had been reason enough.

Until she’d warmed his feet.

Everything had changed at that moment. Duncan had known with a certainty he couldn’t deny that they
were henceforth bound together. He could never let her go.”

Duncan and Madelyne sitting in a tree….

“I am not a poor child, Lady Eleanor,” Madelyne announced, letting her anger sound in her voice.

“Duncan won’t marry you. He won’t sign the contracts. He’d have to give up his greatest treasure in order to marry you.”

“And what be that treasure?” Lady Eleanor inquired, her voice mild.

“Why, I’m Duncan’s greatest treasure. He’d be a fool to give me up,” she added. “And even you must know that Duncan is anything but a fool.”

“Made­lyne, I would like to speak to you in pri­vate after din­ner.”

“Speak to me about what?” Made­lyne de­manded with a dis­grun­tled look.

“Men and their horses,” Dun­can told her.”

“I do know, however, that they took more than one man to their beds.”

Adela gasped and Madelyne nodded, thoroughly satisfied by her friend’s reaction. “More than one at a time?” Adela asked. She whispered the question and then blushed with embarrassment.

Madelyne nibbled on her lip while she considered if that was possible.

“I don’t think so,” she finally announced. Her back was to the door, and Adela’s full attention was centered on her friend. Neither noticed Duncan now stood in the open doorway.”

“It’s a shame you know,” he called over his shoulder.

“What’s a shame?” Duncan asked.

“That I didn’t capture her first.”

Duncan smiled. “Nay, Edmond, it was a blessing. God’s truth, I would have taken her from you.”

Each of these scenes were such good ones and I know that if you haven’t read the book, you won’t get some of these references but that I promise, they’re great. You should definitely check this one out for yourself. You will love Duncan and Madelyne. I swear it!

This is what I look like when I read this one:

Read it, you’ll love it!

Giveaway: We’re giving one lucky winner their choice of one of our Sunday Spotlight books. Use the Rafflecopter widget below to enter for one of this month’s features.

a Rafflecopter giveaway

Have you read Honor’s Splendour before? Did you love it as much as we did? If you haven’t read it, why not? You should really fix that pronto!

About the Author

Julie Garwood

WEBSITE | TWITTER | FACEBOOK | PINTEREST | GOODREADS

It’s no surprise that Julie Garwood became a writer. Growing up in a large family of Irish heritage, she took to storytelling naturally. “The Irish relish getting all the details of every situation,” she explains. “Add in the fact that I was the sixth of seven children. Early in life I learned that self-expression had to be forceful, imaginative, and quick.”

Creating stories was always a passion for Julie, but she didn’t focus on making it a career until the youngest of her three children entered school. After the publications of two young adult books, she turned her interests to historical fiction. Her first novel, GENTLE WARRIOR, was published in 1985, and there has been a steady parade of bestsellers ever since. Today more than 40-million copies of her books are in print, and they are translated in dozens of languages around the world. One of her most popular novels, FOR THE ROSES, was adapted for a HALLMARK HALL OF FAME production on CBS.

Whether the setting be medieval Scotland, Regency England, frontier Montana, or modern-day Louisiana, her themes are consistent: family, loyalty, and honor. Readers claim that it’s the humor as well as poignancy of her novels that keep them coming back for more. Julie described her goals this way: “I want my readers to laugh and cry and fall in love. Basically, I want them to escape into another world for a little while and afterwards to feel as though they’ve been on a great adventure.”

Julie lives in Leawood, Kansas, and is currently working on her next novel.

7 Comments
Tags: , ,


Guest Review: For the Roses by Julie Garwood

Posted July 6, 2015 by Ames in Reviews | 1 Comment

fortheroses
Ames’ review of For the Roses by Julie Garwood.

The Clayborne brothers were a rough gang of street urchins – until they found an abandoned baby girl in a New York City alley, named her Mary Rose, and headed to Blue Belle, Montana, to raise her to be a lady. They became a family – held together by loyalty and love if not blood – when suddenly a stranger threatened to tear them apart…Lord Harrison Stanford MacDonald brandished a six-shooter and a swagger, but he soon proved to be a gentleman to the core. The brothers taught him frontier survival, while Mary Rose touched his heart with a deep and desperate passion. But soon, a shattering secret would challenge everything Mary Rose believed about herself, her life, and her newfound love.
For the Roses was the very first romance I read. Ever. I had the urge to re-read it recently, something I haven’t done in forever, and I was pleased that I still enjoyed it. I re-read Garwood’s medieval romances quite often so I know her early books usually hold up even though they were published in the 1990s.

So our story begins in New York City in 1860. Four young street urchins discover a baby girl thrown away in the garbage. Through various experiences of their own, they don’t trust leaving the baby with an orphanage and decide to head West to raise her themselves. They have no experience but they’re quite the resourceful bunch. So Adam, Cole, Travis and Douglas wind up in Blue Belle, Montana and raise Mary Rose. Nineteen years go by and Mary Rose has returned to Blue Belle after being sent to boarding school in St. Louis for a couple of years. Not too long after her return, a stranger comes to Blue Belle. Harrison MacDonald. He’s on a mission and he sets it up so that he meets Mary Rose in town. Although he can take care of himself, he’s heard that Mary Rose has a soft spot for those who can’t fend for themselves so he swallows his pride and pretends to not know as much as he does. He’s invited back to the Claybourne ranch where Mary Rose’s four older brothers will teach him how to survive in the west and become a rancher. It isn’t long before Harrison and Mary Rose begin to fall for each other but when Mary Rose discovers the truth of why Harrison has come to Blue Belle, it could destroy her and her family.

I pretty much remembered the whole plot from all those many years ago but a few things surprised me. But one thing that always stuck out was the humor. Harrison comes from England and there’s a particular way things are done there. The Claybournes turn everything he thinks he knows on its head. They speak French at the dinner table on alternating days, they claim to be siblings but there’s no resemblance between any of them, they try on different religions for three months at a time. Those are just a few examples of things that want to make Harrison bang his head on a hard surface. LOL I especially enjoyed his friendship with Cole. Those two were very similar.

I felt that of the brothers, Adam and Cole were the most developed. Travis and Douglas were a bit more in the background. Which was fine. I also liked the townsfolk. Especially at the end when one of the brothers’ pasts catches up with him.

And Mary Rose was a quirky heroine. She grew up quite capable under the watchful eyes of her brothers so she can take care of herself. Something that surprises Harrison. He’s used to English women. And Mary Rose is like a breath of fresh air to him. She’s honest and wears her emotions on her sleeve. I like how when Harrison acts of character (but not really) Mary Rose refers to it as a “spell.” And when Harrison does what he does…well it still broke my heart. And I didn’t think he groveled enough. I got freaking annoyed when Mary Rose apologizes! But I was happy with how everything turned out. And Harrison was such a yummy hero. I forgot how much I enjoyed him.

For a book that I read over 15 years ago, I thought it held up very well. 4 out of 5. I recommend this one if you’re in the mood for a historical western.

This book is available from Dutton. You can buy it here or here in e-format.

1 Comment
Tags: , , , , , , ,


Review: The Lion’s Lady by Julie Garwood

Posted October 15, 2014 by Holly in Reviews | 9 Comments

Review: The Lion’s Lady by Julie GarwoodReviewer: Holly
The Lion's Lady by Julie Garwood
Series: Crown Spies #1
Published by Pocket Books
Publication Date: March 1st 1991
Genres: Fiction, Romance, Historical, General
Pages: 368
Buy on Amazon | Barnes & Noble
Goodreads
four-half-stars

Christina Bennett had taken London society by storm. The ravishing beauty guarded the secret of her mysterious past until the night Lyon, Marquis of Lyonwood, stole a searching, sensuous kiss. An arrogant nobleman with a pirate's passions, he tasted the wild fire smoldering beneath Christina's cool charm and swore to posess her... But the fiesty and defiant Christina would not be so easily conquered. Mistress of her heart and of her fortune, she resisted Lyon's sensuous caresses. She dared not surrender to his love...for then, she must also forsake her precious secret...and her promised destiny!

I forget how much I enjoy Garwood’s regency titles, especially The Lion’s Lady. This book is listed as book 1 in the Crown’s Spies series, but all of the books can be read as stand-alones. Aside from a brief mention of other characters, none of the books are related in any way.

More often than not it’s Garwood’s heroes who stand out for me, even though I tend to like her heroines. In this case, I really love Lyon, the hero, but I absolutely adore Christina, the heroine. She’s totally  unconventional. She was raised by Indians in the Black Hills of South Dakota, can use a knife better than many men, prefers to go barefoot and eats the leaves off bushes. She’s wonderful. Garwood tends to write heroines who are just a little too perfect, but Christina is so refreshing I hardly noticed.

Lyon is the perfect match for her. Though he starts out quite jaded and cynical, it isn’t long before he realizes what a gem Christina is. I especially love that he totally gets her. She kept thinking he wanted only the “civilized” version of herself, but he proves time and again that he loves all of her..even her wild, savage side. Especially her wild, savage side. I especially love how un-sheltered Christina is. She doesn’t shy away from “mating”, what she calls “mischief makers” (thieves and the like), tavern brawls or catty women. She’s sweet, but refuses to cower or take crap from anyone.

“She was such a sweet little thing. ‘Course, she did throw Louie overboard. Flipped him right over her shoulder, she did.

Couldn’t believe it—no, sir, couldn’t believe it. Louie had it coming, though. Why, he snuck up behind her and grabbed her. That’s when I seen the color of her hair. Real light yellow. She’d always been wearing that hood, even in the heat of the afternoons. Must have been mighty uncomfortable.”

“She threw a man overboard?” Bryan asked the question. He knew he shouldn’t interfere in Lyon’s questions, but he was too astonished by Mick’s casually given remark to keep silent. “Enough about the hood, man, tell me more about this girl.”

“Well, it were a good thing for Louie the wind weren’t up. We fished him out of the water without too much backache. He left the miss alone after that surprise. Come to think on it, most o’ the men did.”

There could have been a lot of angst or a dark theme to this book, but instead it’s a light read. There’s a lot of humor. Lyon’s confusion anytime Christina speaks in riddles, the customs she brought to England with her from the wild’s of the Dakotas, etc, made for a very entertaining read.

“Thank you for your assistance, Rhone. Lyon, what are you going to do about those men cluttering my walkway? And am I mistaken, or are there one or two in the back of the house as well?”

“There are two,” Lyon said. “I threw them out back.”

“They’ll wake up and crawl home,” Rhone advised. “Unless, of course, you—”

“I didn’t,” Lyon said.

“Didn’t what?” Christina asked.

“Kill them,” Rhone said.

“Rhone, don’t frighten her,” Lyon said.

“Goodness, I hope not. Think of the mess.” Christina sounded appalled, but for all the wrong reasons.

I think what stands out for me most in terms of the relationship is how quickly Lyon was willing to accept all of her. He saw her threaten his former paramour at knife-point, eat leaves from shrubs, throw a dagger with precision aim, and ride bareback and he didn’t flinch or cower. They were also surprisingly open with each other. There were no silly misunderstandings (aside from Christina worrying he wanted a princess, rather than her as she truly was), or long drawn-out obstacles because they didn’t talk to one another. Christina kept parts of her past hidden, but once she trusted Lyon she opened up fully. And he never expected her to be anything but what she was.

“Why don’t you like the people?” he asked. His voice had turned soft, soothing, Christina thought he really might be thinking she’d just lost her mind.

“I don’t like the way they act,” she announced. “The women take lovers after they’ve pledged themselves to a mate. They treat their old like discarded garbage. That is their most appalling flaw,” Christina said.

“The old should be honored, not ignored. And their children, Lyon. I hear about the little ones, but I’ve yet to see one. The mothers lock their children away in their schoolrooms. Don’t they understand the children are the heartbeat of the family? No, Lyon, I could not survive here.”

She paused to take a deep breath, then suddenly realized Lyon didn’t look very upset about her comments. “Why aren’t you angry?” she asked.

He grabbed her when she tried to step away from him again, wrapped his arms around her, and held her close to him. “First of all, I agree with most of what you’ve just said. Second, all during your irate protest you kept saying’they,’ not ‘you.’ You didn’t include me with the others, and as long as it’s the other English you dislike, that’s quite all right with me. You told me once you thought I was different. It’s why you’ve been drawn to me, isn’t it? It doesn’t really matter.” he added with a sigh. “You and I are both English. You can’t change that fact, Christina, just as you can’t change the fact that you belong to me now.”

The suspense plot featuring Christina’s father was pretty weak, but again, I love how Lyon and Christina deal with it together. The scenes where Christina interacts with Lyon’s family had me laughing out loud, and really served to make the story come alive.

This is a novel I’ve read again and again. It never fails to pull me in and lift my spirits. If you haven’t read it before, I suggest you pick up a copy now. You’re missing out on a sweet, wonderful tale.

4.75 out of 5

four-half-stars

9 Comments
Tags: , , , , , ,