Tag: 5 Reviews

Guest Review: Rushing Waters by Danielle Steel

Posted December 20, 2016 by Tina R in Reviews | 1 Comment

Guest Review: Rushing Waters by Danielle SteelReviewer: Tina
Rushing Waters by Danielle Steel
Published by Delacorte Press
Publication Date: August 30, 2016
Genres: Contemporary
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five-stars

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • Danielle Steel fearlessly tackles a catastrophe and its aftermath with characters who are joined together by accident, then share their vulnerabilities, regrets, losses, and hopes.

Hurricane Ophelia is bearing down on New York City. And in a matter of hours, six people, along with their families, friends, and millions of other New Yorkers living around them, will be caught up in the horrific flooding it unleashes.

Ellen Wharton has flown into New York from London, regardless of the weather and her husband’s worry. The successful interior designer is intent on seeing her lively architect mother and has an important personal appointment to keep. But despite Ellen’s urging, when the storm hits, seventy-four-year-old Grace Madison refuses to leave her Tribeca apartment in the midst of the evacuation zone, and they must eventually wade through chest-high water to the police boats outside.

British investment banker Charles Williams is traveling on business but is also eager to see his young daughters, who live with his beautiful, estranged ex-wife in SoHo. Desperate to find them, he checks the shelters where thousands have taken refuge and runs into Ellen and her mother.

Juliette Dubois, a dedicated ER doctor, fights to save lives when the generators at her hospital fail.

NYU students Peter Holbrook and Ben Weiss, living in a shabby downtown walkup, are excited by the adventure of the approaching hurricane, refuse to evacuate, and settle in with junk food and beer until their building threatens to collapse. Should they swim for it or not?

A day of chaos takes its toll. Lives, belongings, and loved ones are swept away. Heroes are revealed as the city and New Yorkers struggle to face a natural disaster of epic proportions. And then the real challenge begins, as the survivors face their futures, with damage to repair and scars to heal.

Keenly observed and brilliantly told, this is an unforgettable story that proves that while life can change in an instant, even the darkest storm can bring forth courage, resilience, unexpected joy, and new life. And it reminds us all that nature, at its fiercest, is a powerful force nothing and no one can resist.

I have to say that I honestly do not believe that I have ever read a book by Danielle Steel that I didn’t absolutely love! Every single book that I have read by her has been fantastic! Whenever you pick up a book by Danielle you can be sure that you are getting your money’s worth. The characters are always so well thought-out that you are immediately captivated by them. There are some I remember because I totally loved them and there are some that I really disliked, but either way, I remember them, and this is because they have been created so magnificently with great depth and exquisite detail. I love Danielle Steel’s books for this reason. She always gives 100% with her writing.

Rushing Waters is a very powerful story. Since our country has just experienced Hurricane Hermine in September, this book really hit home for a lot of people. As I read the book, it made me realize just what people must have went through as they were experiencing the real thing. The description of the destruction was so detailed that I felt anxious as I was reading. There were many people in the book that didn’t take it serious when the newscasts were saying to evacuate and when the hurricane finally arrived, many were unprepared. Then in the aftermath of the disaster, we see how people had to pull together and support each other through the horrible tragedy.

Rushing Waters does tell the story of a disaster, but it is also a story of new beginnings as well. It shows just how much strength people actually have when they think they have none. It made me want to hug all the people I care about.

I highly recommend this book to anyone that appreciates a well -written story. Danielle Steele proves once again why her books are always on the bestseller list!

five-stars

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Review: Someone Like You by Lauren Layne

Posted December 16, 2016 by Rowena in Reviews | 10 Comments

Review: Someone Like You by Lauren LayneReviewer: Rowena
Someone Like You by Lauren Layne
Published by Random House, Loveswept
Publication Date: December 6th 2016
Genres: Contemporary, Romance
Pages: 228
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five-stars

Lauren Layne’s bestselling Oxford Series continues with the poignant, heartwarming story of New York’s most eligible bachelor, Lincoln Mathis, a man who’s living a lie—until his dream woman takes away the pain.

Lincoln Mathis doesn’t hide his reputation as Manhattan’s ultimate playboy. In fact, he cultivates it. But behind every flirtatious smile, each provocative quip, there’s a secret that Lincoln’s hiding from even his closest friends—a tragedy from his past that holds his heart quietly captive. Lincoln knows what he wants: someone like Daisy Sinclair, the sassy, off-limits bridesmaid he can’t take his eyes off at his best friend’s wedding. He also knows that she’s everything he can never have.

After a devastating divorce, Daisy doesn’t need anyone to warn her off the charming best man at her sister’s wedding. One look at the breathtakingly hot Lincoln Mathis and she knows that he’s exactly the type of man she should avoid. But when Daisy stumbles upon Lincoln’s secret, she realizes there’s more to the charming playboy than meets the eye. And suddenly Daisy and Lincoln find their lives helplessly entwined in a journey that will either heal their damaged souls . . . or destroy them forever.

I couldn’t start this book fast enough. Nick and Nereyda had already read and loved it so I knew that only good things awaited me so the first chance I got, I jumped in. I’m so happy to report that Lauren Layne does not disappoint with Lincoln Mathis’ book.

From the moment readers have met Lincoln Mathis, they have been intrigued by this man. He’s not the relationship type, gets all of the girls but at the end of the night, everyone leaves happy and with no hard feelings. There aren’t any crazy ladies trying to break down his door for explanations about why he never called. There aren’t any hurt feelings. Everyone loves Lincoln Mathis and with everyone in his circle of friends pairing up, it’s Lincoln’s turn, right?

Wrong.

Lincoln has no interest in pairing up with anyone. You find out why he feels the way that he does when you dig into his story and I won’t get into those things in this review because…you have to read those things for yourself.

Lincoln was everything I hoped he would be and more. I went into this book, ready to know what Lincoln’s been hiding from the rest of the group and to really dig into his personality and his background. I wasn’t disappointed. I got all of that and more. I think Layne did a great job of giving readers what they’ve been waiting for and bringing Lincoln to life. We got to see what Lincoln was really about and I was here for that party. I loved every minute.

Daisy Sinclair was the last person I was thinking of for Lincoln. He was such a big character that I was afraid nobody would be good enough for him. I didn’t think he had an equal (yes, he was that big a character for me) but Daisy was perfect for him in every way. The way that she saw right through him from the jump had me sitting up and taking notice. I loved that she could relate to him on a level that nobody else could. Nobody got him the way that she did and man, her story really hit me in the feels. She was such a lovely character, so different from her twin sister but no less wonderful and I came to love the hell out of her.

I really liked the way that these two came together. First as friends and then their friendship grew into something so much bigger than either of them was expecting. They were both so lonely, their stories so different but they understood each other. They cared about each other. I loved it all.

Lauren Layne is my author of the year. She has literally knocked me on my ass time and time again this year alone and in a year that has been one craptastic day after another, I was glad to have so many of her books to look forward to. This was another wonderfully romantic story that hit me in my feels at every turn and fans of Lincoln Mathis will not be disappointed with his story because it’s great, you guys. So stinkin’ great. I highly recommend this book to everyone.


5 out of 5

five-stars

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Guest Review: The First Time She Drowned by Kerry Kletter

Posted November 8, 2016 by Tina R in Reviews | 0 Comments

Guest Review: The First Time She Drowned by Kerry KletterReviewer: Tina
The First Time She Drowned by Kerry Kletter
Published by Philomel Books
Publication Date: March 15th 2016
Genres: Contemporary, Women's Fiction
Pages: 352
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five-stars

Cassie O’Malley has been trying to keep her head above water—literally and metaphorically—since birth. It’s been two and a half years since Cassie’s mother dumped her in a mental institution against her will, and now, at eighteen, Cassie is finally able to reclaim her life and enter the world on her own terms.

But freedom is a poor match against a lifetime of psychological damage. As Cassie plumbs the depths of her new surroundings, the startling truths she uncovers about her own family narrative make it impossible to cut the tethers of a tumultuous past. And when the unhealthy mother-daughter relationship that defined Cassie’s childhood and adolescence threatens to pull her under once again, Cassie must decide: whose version of history is real? And more important, whose life must she save?

A bold, literary story about the fragile complexities of mothers and daughters and learning to love oneself, The First Time She Drowned reminds us that we must dive deep into our pasts if we are ever to move forward.

Wow!!

That pretty much sums up my review for The First Time She Drowned by Kerry Kletter. I found this one at the library and just grabbed it for something to read at night before I went to bed. Little did I know that this would soon become a book that I would consider to be one of my favorites!

I found the book to be a little slow to get into at first. But, by the middle of the book I found myself eager to find out what was going to happen next. By the time I got to the last 10 chapters or so, I was so immersed, that I found myself sitting up to finish it after the rest of the world was fast asleep!! I think I held my breath pretty much during the last 6 chapters or so!

The First Time She Drowned by Kerry Kletter is a one of those books that you don’t find every day. It is one of those that grabs you by the throat and makes you pay attention. I absolutely loved it and have recommended it to many of my bibliophile friends. I highly recommend it to you as well.

So check out the description and decide for yourself. But believe me, if you choose to pass on this one you will definitely be missing out!!

five-stars

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Guest Review: The Education of Dixie Dupree by Donna Everhart

Posted November 1, 2016 by Tina R in Reviews | 0 Comments

Guest Review: The Education of Dixie Dupree by Donna EverhartReviewer: Tina
The Education of Dixie Dupree by Donna Everhart
Published by Kensington
Publication Date: October 25th 2016
Genres: Contemporary, Women's Fiction
Pages: 352
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five-stars

In 1969, Dixie Dupree is eleven years old and already an expert liar. Sometimes the lies are for her mama, Evie’s sake—to explain away a bruise brought on by her quick-as-lightning temper. And sometimes the lies are to spite Evie, who longs to leave her unhappy marriage in Perry County, Alabama, and return to her beloved New Hampshire. But for Dixie and her brother, Alabama is home, a place of pine-scented breezes and hot, languid afternoons.

Though Dixie is learning that the family she once believed was happy has deep fractures, even her vivid imagination couldn’t concoct the events about to unfold. Dixie records everything in her diary—her parents’ fights, her father’s drinking and his unexplained departure, and the arrival of Uncle Ray. Only when Dixie desperately needs help and is met with disbelief does she realize how much damage her past lies have done. But she has courage and a spirit that may yet prevail, forcing secrets into the open and allowing her to forgive and become whole again.

Narrated by her young heroine in a voice as sure and resonant as The Secret Life of Bees’ Lily or Bastard Out of Carolina’s Bone, Donna Everhart’s remarkable debut is a story about mothers and daughters, the guilt and pain that pass between generations, and the truths that are impossible to hide, especially from ourselves.

When I review a book, I don’t feel like it is necessary for me to tell you what the book is about. That is what the synopsis is for, and the publisher does a far better job than I do, believe it. What I feel my purpose is when I write a review is to tell you why you SHOULD read the book, or sometimes, why you SHOULDN’T.

When I write a review, I am giving you my honest impression. I try to convey how the book made me feel, if I enjoyed reading it, and if I would recommend it to anyone else. With this being said, I just want you to know that The Education of Dixie Dupree by Donna Everhart is a book that you shouldn’t pass up. This book is an incredibly powerful coming of age story that totally overwhelmed me emotionally. It isn’t one of those books that give you that warm fuzzy feeling as you read it – instead it literally knocks you on your ass. The subjects presented aren’t always pretty and they are not packaged that way either. There is no quiet way to address them, and there shouldn’t be. Sometimes an author has to get your attention. And Donna Everhart has that down to a science.

This is a story of a family . A REAL family. One that is made up of imperfect people in less-than-ideal situations. It is a book that doesn’t promise a happy ending. It will break your heart at times. But you will remember this book. Believe me, you will.

My two favorite books of all times besides To Kill A Mockingbird are books just like this one. They are The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd and Saving CeeCee Honeycutt by Beth Hoffman. These are books that will remain on my bookshelf although the rest of my library is now digital. They are books that I cherish and talk about frequently, and ones that I highly recommend. Now, I have another book that will be sitting on that shelf as well, and it is this one.

So please take the time to read the book’s description and decide for yourself if you think this would be something you would be interested in. I read some reviews that call the book “predictable”, but I honestly didn’t feel that way. How can you predict a child’s reaction to things they don’t truly understand. Even if they seem wise beyond their years, they are still children. Dixie will remain in my memory for a long time to come. Just like Scout, Lilly and CeeCee do.

I would like to thank the author, the publisher and NetGalley for giving me the privilege of reviewing this amazing book. It would make a fantastic book club read, and an amazing movie. I really hope you give it a try.

Grade: 5 out of 5

five-stars

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Guest Review: Longbourn by Jo Baker

Posted October 10, 2016 by Tina R in Reviews | 1 Comment

Guest Review:  Longbourn by Jo BakerReviewer: Tina
Longbourn by Jo Baker
Published by Knopf
Publication Date: October 8th 2013
Genres: Contemporary, Women's Fiction
Pages: 352
Buy on Amazon | Barnes & Noble
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five-stars

Pride and Prejudice was only half the story • 

If Elizabeth Bennet had the washing of her own petticoats, Sarah often thought, she’d most likely be a sight more careful with them.

  In this irresistibly imagined belowstairs answer to Pride and Prejudice, the servants take center stage. Sarah, the orphaned housemaid, spends her days scrubbing the laundry, polishing the floors, and emptying the chamber pots for the Bennet household. But there is just as much romance, heartbreak, and intrigue downstairs at Longbourn as there is upstairs. When a mysterious new footman arrives, the orderly realm of the servants’ hall threatens to be completely, perhaps irrevocably, upended.

Jo Baker dares to take us beyond the drawing rooms of Jane Austen’s classic—into the often overlooked domain of the stern housekeeper and the starry-eyed kitchen maid, into the gritty daily particulars faced by the lower classes in Regency England during the Napoleonic Wars—and, in doing so, creates a vivid, fascinating, fully realized world that is wholly her own.

I have to begin by saying how much I enjoyed Longbourn by Jo Baker. I was immediately swept up in this tale which is basically the story of Pride and Prejudice through the eyes of the below-stairs staff. It is well-researched and beautifully written, and dedicates itself to show the reader the grueling life of the servants in the early 19th century.

Longbourn assumes the reader is already familiar with the works of Jane Austen, so begins immediately with the tale of the servants. Instead of presenting us with the seemingly glamorous lifestyle of the Bennett family, we are instead whisked away below stairs where we find the people who were responsible for all the back-breaking tasks that made that lifestyle possible.

Jo Baker is definitely an amazing story-teller. I was entirely captivated by this book. The author provides vivid details into the lives of the servant staff which made me feel like I was transported back in time and experiencing it all for myself.

You will find yourself becoming attached to the staff and rooting them on, feeling their despair, and wanting the best for them as you follow their struggles and daily hardships. It will make you appreciate all the daily conveniences that we have in our own lives today.

I totally recommend Longbourn to anyone who loves the works of Jane Austen or who, like me, is just fascinated with tales of domestic service in the early 19th century. You will not be disappointed. This one is a classic!!

five-stars

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