Tag: Jayne Ann Krentz

Guest Review: When All the Girls Have Gone by Jayne Ann Krentz

Posted February 23, 2018 by Jen in Reviews | 1 Comment

Guest Review: When All the Girls Have Gone by Jayne Ann KrentzReviewer: Jen
When All the Girls Have Gone (Cutler, Sutter and Salinas #1) by Jayne Ann Krentz
Series: Cutler Sutter and Salinas #1
Published by Berkley Books
Publication Date: November 29th 2016
Genres: Romantic Suspense
Pages: 352
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two-stars

Jayne Ann Krentz, the New York Times bestselling author of Secret Sisters, delivers a thrilling novel of the deceptions we hide behind, the passions we surrender to, and the lengths we’ll go to for the truth...

When Charlotte Sawyer is unable to contact her step-sister, Jocelyn, to tell her that one her closest friends was found dead, she discovers that Jocelyn has vanished.

Beautiful, brilliant—and reckless—Jocelyn has gone off the grid before, but never like this. In a desperate effort to find her, Charlotte joins forces with Max Cutler, a struggling PI who recently moved to Seattle after his previous career as a criminal profiler went down in flames—literally. Burned out, divorced and almost broke, Max needs the job.

After surviving a near-fatal attack, Charlotte and Max turn to Jocelyn’s closest friends, women in a Seattle-based online investment club, for answers. But what they find is chilling…

When her uneasy alliance with Max turns into a full-blown affair, Charlotte has no choice but to trust him with her life. For the shadows of Jocelyn’s past are threatening to consume her—and anyone else who gets in their way...

After reading over a dozen books in a few days while home with the flu, I just couldn’t find any new books that grabbed me. When this one caught my interest I actually broke my usual rule and paid full price for it. Unfortunately, the book was a big disappointment.

Charlotte receives a mysterious package on her sister’s behalf. The package was sent by a woman in her sister’s investment club. When the friend who sent the package ends up dead, Charlotte starts poking around and comes into contact with Max, a private investigator hired by the dead woman’s cousin to investigate the death. Soon, it becomes clear Charlotte’s sister is missing, and other dangers seem to be centered around the women in the club. Is the danger due to the club’s investment activities, or is it something more personal?

Like I said, the synopsis sounded thrilling, but the reality of the book didn’t live up to the premise. First, there really was no mystery. It was clear early on who the villains, and even the attempted twist at the end was not at all surprising. The danger never felt that acute, and the investigation was kind of lackluster.

Charlotte and Max are both pretty forgettable characters. Charlotte works at a senior community, which provides plenty of opportunities for ridiculous elderly plot moppets. She’s pretty vanilla and honestly doesn’t have much that makes her stand out. Max burned out of law enforcement and now is trying to start his own PI business, so naturally the first case he takes is one he knows will make him little, if any, money. Sounds like a solid business plan, no? He’s also got a bunch of family drama, which gets resolved way too tidily in this book, and some mysteries from his past, which don’t get resolved and I presume will form the longer story arc of this new series. None of it grabbed me.

Most disappointing of all was the romance, though. There is no sexual tension, and the actual sex is definitely lukewarm. I did like that there’s no real conflict of interest or drama about being together. Max knows he’s interested and wants to get to know Charlotte. Too bad there’s no real chemistry either. 

All in all, this was a bland and forgettable story, and it reminds me why I don’t pay full price for most books.

Grade: 2 out of 5

two-stars


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12 Days of Bookmas with Jayne Ann Krentz: Day 3

Posted December 3, 2016 by Holly in Giveaways, Promotions | 17 Comments

bookmas-banner-garden-of-lies

We’re very excited to participate in The 12 Days of Bookmas with Jayne Ann Krentz to celebrate the release of her latest romantic suspense, When All the Girls Have Gone.

Jayne Ann Krentz, the New York Times bestselling author of Secret Sisters, delivers a thrilling novel of the deceptions we hide behind, the passions we surrender to, and the lengths we’ll go to for the truth…
 
When Charlotte Sawyer is unable to contact her stepsister, Jocelyn, to tell her that one of her closest friends was found dead, she discovers that Jocelyn has vanished.  
 
Beautiful, brilliant—and reckless—Jocelyn has gone off the grid before, but never like this. In a desperate effort to find her, Charlotte joins forces with Max Cutler, a struggling PI who recently moved to Seattle after his previous career as a criminal profiler went down in flames—literally. Burned out, divorced and almost broke, Max needs the job.   
 
After surviving a near-fatal attack, Charlotte and Max turn to Jocelyn’s closest friends, women in a Seattle-based online investment club, for answers. But what they find is chilling…
 
When her uneasy alliance with Max turns into a full-blown affair, Charlotte has no choice but to trust him with her life. For the shadows of Jocelyn’s past are threatening to consume her—and anyone else who gets in their way…

 

TWELVE DAYS OF BOOKMAS
By
Jayne Ann Krentz
In which I answer the twelve questions that I am most frequently asked and recommend a book for that hard-to-buy-for person on your holiday list.

THIRD DAY OF BOOKMAS

Question # 3: Why do you write in three different eras?

Ah, yes, I get this question a lot. Why do I write historical settings (under my Amanda Quick pen name), futuristics (under my Jayne Castle name) and contemporaries (under my Jayne Ann Krentz name)? The answer is that each time period allows me to do different kinds of plots. Some stories work best in a futuristic landscape – plots that use a lot of paranormal elements, for example. Others come to life in an historical setting with its more rigid social rules. The historical landscape is perfect for plots in which the characters solve mysteries without relying on modern forensics. And there a lot of plots that work well in a contemporary setting.

I love working in each of my three worlds – I find it refreshing as an author to move in and out of three different fictional landscapes. And, no, not all of my readers will follow me into all three worlds. Turns out a lot of readers have very strong preferences when it comes to fictional settings and this is true in every genre. Many readers simply won’t read anything set against a science fiction or fantasy landscape for example. Others won’t read historical settings. Even within genres people are often reluctant to move between worlds. Readers who love the British mystery, for example, won’t necessarily step into the noir world of the American private investigator. And so it goes.

Day 3 Book Recommendation for Holiday Gifting:

Speaking of the British mystery, this is an excellent, modern, example. It’s the fourth book in Cameron’s Cotswold murder mysteries series featuring pub owner Alex Duggins and her veterinarian friend, Tony Harrison. A great gift for that person on your list who prefers clever mysteries with plots that don’t rely on a lot of blood and gore.

MELODY OF MURDER by Stella Cameron.

We’re giving away a copy of Garden of Lies by Amanda Quick (Print Copy. US Only)! Use the rafflecopter widget below to enter.

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jayne-ann-krentz

Jayne Ann Krentz is the author of more than fifty New York Times bestsellers. She has written contemporary romantic suspense novels under that name, as well as futuristic and historical romance novels under the pseudonyms Jayne Castle and Amanda Quick, respectively. Learn more at jayneannkrentz.com and connect with her on facebook.com/JayneAnnKrentz.


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